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Kitezh – The Russian Lost Atlantis

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The first reference to Kitezh comes in an anonymous late 18th century book known as the Kitezh Chronicle which was thought to have originated among the Old Believers of Russia.

In the early 13th century, Grand Prince of Vladimir, Georgy II, first built the town of Maly Kitezh (Little Kitezh) on the Volga River (today’s Krasny Kholm).
Later on, the prince crossed the rivers of Uzola, Sanda, and Kerzhenets, and found a beautiful spot on the shores of Lake Svetloyar near Nizhny Novgorod, where he decided to build the town of Bolshoy Kitezh (Big Kitezh).
Residents of Nizhny Novgorod are sure that the legends of their Kitezh date from the earliest days of Rus’, but the first mention of this sacred city dates back to the modern times.
The death of Prince Georgy Vsevolodovich under the walls of Kitezh walls was outlined in the Kitezh Chronicle, which was created by Old Believers in the 1780s. The Chronicle does not mention the disappearance of the city into the lake – just that it disappeared after it was destroyed and all its inhabitants killed.
According to legend, after having conquered some of the Russian lands, Batu Khan of Mongol Empire, leader of the Golden Horde, heard of Kitezh and ordered his army to advance towards it.
The Mongols soon captured Maly Kitezh, forcing Georgy to retreat into the woods towards Bolshoy Kitezh. One of the prisoners told the Mongols about some secret paths to Lake Svetloyar.
The Invisible Town of Kitezh (1913) by Konstantin Gorbatov
The Invisible Town of Kitezh (1913) by Konstantin Gorbatov
The army of the Golden Horde followed Georgy and soon reached the walls of the town. To the surprise of the Mongols, the town had no fortifications whatsoever. Its citizens didn’t even intend to defend themselves and were engaged in fervent praying, asking God for their salvation.
On seeing this, the Mongols rushed to the attack, but then stopped. Suddenly, they saw countless fountains of water bursting from under the ground all around them. The attackers fell back and watched the town submerge into the lake. The last thing they saw was a glaring dome of a cathedral with a cross on top of it. Soon only waves remained.
In 1968, scientists led by renowned archaeologists Mark Barinov and Tatiana Makarova began searching for the lost city and examined every corner of the lake shores; the divers explored even the topography of the lake bottom. Sadly, no artifacts more ancient than the 19th century were found.
As a result, scientists for many years held the view that Kitezh never actually existed outside of legend. However, in 2006 the Vetluzhsky archaeological expedition decided to take another look.
It started an investigation of Krestovozdvizhensky Hill, where an old chapel stood that had not been sufficiently examined by previous expeditions. Six year later, at the Svetloyar Lake, archaeologists have found traces of an unknown medieval settlement that became a prototype for Kitezh, the “Russian Atlantis.”
Thousands of shards of pottery, fragments of iron knives, pieces of harness, a millstone and a tinderbox is practically all that is left of the Rusich, who lived six centuries ago on the shores of Svetloyar Lake. But there is something else – the remains of log cabins, found at a half-meter depth below the surface of the lake.
“Most likely, this was not a city but an odnodvorka – a house with outbuildings that housed 10-15 people,” said Evgeny Chetvertakov, head of the Vetluzhsky archaeological expedition.
“Perhaps, in reality, this settlement was larger, but then part of it was taken by landslides into Svetloyar, and that formed the basis of legends about the mysterious disappearance of the city of Kitezh.”
The lost city of Kitezh is also mentioned, among many other references to Russian folklore, in “Monday Begins on Saturday”, a novel by Boris and Arkady Strugatsky and Charodey film and film script.
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov’s opera “The Legend of the Invisible City of Kitezh” and “the Maiden Fevroniya” (1907) is based on the legend of Kitezh. Kitezh is a central part of the plot in the 2015 video game Rise of the Tomb Raider.
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Miners in Siberia dug up a strange statue of an angel with shield and sword in the permafrost

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Miners of the Elga coal deposit (Yakut) in Siberia dug up a strange statue in the form of a woman with a sword and shield, and behind it there seem to be wings, like a fallen angel. The statue was unearthed by an excavator.

Miners show their emotions and enthusiasm when they are standing next to the statue. If the translation is right, they say that they cannot describe or tell what it is and that right now the special services will arrive by helicopter to pick up the statue to an unknown location. 
Further study and examination by experts may be required to determine the significance of this potentially valuable ancient artifact, but since the special services are involved, it remains to be seen whether we will hear anything about it in the future.

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Isaac Newton’s Predictions: The Apocalypse Will Come in 2060

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Mankind has been waiting for the end of the world for a long time. The latest example is 2012. Many have stocked up on canned food and other necessities. But whether the Mayans were wrong or we misunderstood them, the world did not end. Nothing catastrophic on a global scale happened on December 21, 2012.

Is there anything to fear now? Are there prophecies that point to a specific date? And not dubious predictions from uneducated fraudsters, but from respected people – like the Mayans.

Every year we see the alleged predictions of Baba Vanga and Nostradamus. In most cases, the end of the world is always linked to them in one way or another. But seriously, we can hardly believe in any of them anymore.

Here’s another name that has been associated with doomsday predictions in recent decades – the famous scientist Isaac Newton. Based on information from his personal manuscripts, we know that he tried to calculate the exact year of the apocalypse – 2060. Here’s what we know.

The many interests of Isaac Newton

The fact that Isaac Newton indicated the date of Armageddon, experts learned at the end of 2002, when manuscripts with his notes were discovered.

They had been kept for many years in the National Library of Israel among the unorganized archives of the author of the First, Second and Third Laws and, of course, the Law of Universal Attraction.

After scientists discovered and read the previously unknown manuscripts of the genius, it turned out that in addition to mechanics, physics and mathematics, he also studied alchemy, occultism, astrology and theology.

After Newton’s death in 1727, thousands of pages dedicated to his “secret passions” were kept in a chest in the home of the Earl of Portsmouth for more than 200 years. In 1936, most of the manuscripts were purchased at auction by the Jewish scholar Abraham Yehuda.

As a result, they ended up in the National Library of Israel.

There is Newton’s manuscript with a prophecy about the end of the world in 2060. It was discovered by Harvard University Professor Stephen Snobelen, who began the initial research.

Newton’s previously inaccessible manuscripts testify to the fact that alchemy, theology and the occult came to the fore, and his serious discoveries were the result of this “obscurantism”.

For example, the law of universal attraction did not appear thanks to the famous apple, but thanks to the concept of the attraction of one element to another, which was proclaimed by alchemy. Another example is Newton’s famous physical theory of absolute space and time, which was based on the theological ideas of the genius of physics.

He believed that absolute space is the place inhabited by God, the form of existence of His universal spirit, and absolute time is the infinite duration of the divine presence.

In addition, Newton believed that due to the divine structure of the universe, any impact is immediately transmitted to each of its points without the participation of matter. Curiously, this theory is also considered by some modern physicists who study vacuum and quantum mechanisms.

Now let’s take a closer look at Newton’s actual predictions and the apocalypse.

Part of a 1704 letter to a friend in which Newton calculates the day of the Apocalypse using the Book of Daniel.

Bible Studies and Newton’s Predictions

Newton treated the Bible with a special mystical reverence – he studied it all his life. He believed it contained messages from higher powers about the future of the world. He dreamed of creating a system that would allow the Bible to be used to predict that future.

There is another well-known source that also attracted the attention of a genius – the Book of Daniel (Old Testament), in which the prophet accurately predicted the date of Christ’s coming to earth, the death of the Son of God, and His resurrection.

Newton believed that God had chosen the prophet Daniel to interpret the future. And to “see” it, the book must be deciphered – every word of it. What Newton did for many years-nearly 50, since he also considered himself chosen by God-to try to decipher it.

Mathematically calculating the date of the end of the world, he wrote 4,500 pages of words and formulas. The Book of Daniel itself is a collection of prophecies.

Newton interpreted them in an attempt to create an algorithm suitable for predicting future events. What happened in the end remains to be seen – the archive has not been fully studied. Only the mysterious date of the end of the world, 2060, was discovered.

After understanding the essence of Newton’s manuscripts, Professor Snobelen discovered that the scientist had deciphered the Bible’s references to certain periods of time. Newton defined one of these periods as 1260 years. He then calculated that this period began in 800 AD.

He added 1260 years and came up with 2060. Newton himself wrote that a world war would begin, then there would be a plague that would lead to the destruction of a significant portion of humanity. But after the end of the tribulation, the kingdom of the Messiah will come, and the world will see a new beginning.

In other words, it should be noted that when the prophet prophesied the end of the world, he still believed that after a time of trouble for mankind, an era of prosperity would come when God would live among people to dry their tears of suffering.

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